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Ferrari-saurus Rex

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When it comes to Ferrari, twelve-cylinder engines are the first to come to mind. One does not automatically jump to a pedestrian V6 for a mid-engine sports car. However, for their first mass-produced, entry-level roadster, Ferrari did just that.

The Dino line was an attempt from 1968 to 1976 to create a more affordable Ferrari. “Dino” was chosen as the name of this successor line of vehicles to honor founder Enzo Ferrari’s son Dino. Only three different models were produced over the marquee’s right-year lifespan - the 206 GT and its beefier brother, the 246 GT, as well as the 308 GT4 2+2, a 3.0L V8 model named for its four seats that was later reincorporated into the main Ferrari line after the dissolution of the Dino brand in 1976.


Although all three cars were very well-received at the time of launch, the Dino 246 GT was by far the most iconic, and it is still one Ferrari’s most recognizable classics to this day. The 2.4L V6 put out a sprightly 192hp in a very lightweight vehicle. Its function was modeled mainly after German sports car of the time, which offered affordable power and superior drive-ability to the every-man. Design-wise, the 246 GT mimicked its bigger Ferrari brothers’ dramatic sloping lines and famous pointed nose. A grand total of 3568 cars were built, making this one of the easier classic Ferrari's to find for those looking to restore.

Perhaps the most interesting thing about the Dino line was just how none-Ferrari the entire concept was. By creating a value-centric entry point, Ferrari was conceding its traditional prestige placement to offer a vehicle to the (relatively) average consumer. And it is because of that reason that you could still find a Dino 246 GT in decent condition for a reasonable price today.

-Trey Fennell



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